Archive for July 2012

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Such good advice from one of my favorite blog authors!

Live & Learn

James JoyceFrom NY Times Sunday Book Review by Colson Whitehead: A few excerpts:

Rule No. 1:.

Rule No. 2:. You can’t rush inspiration…you can’t force it. Once your subject finds you, it’s like falling in love. It will be your constant companion…Your ideal subject should be like a stalker with limitless resources…

Rule No. 3:. Ask your heart, Is it true? And if it is, let it be. Once the lawyers sign off, you’re good to go…

Rule No. 4:. Be concise. Don’t fall in love with the gentle trilling of your mellifluous sentences…

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Posted July 29, 2012 by LediaR in Uncategorized

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Cristian Mihai

How much are you willing to pay?

Okay, all jokes aside, “how much” depends on a lot of factors such as:

  1. Your particular set of skills (can you do your own cover/interior formatting?)
  2. Relatives/people you know (if your cousin’s a book designer/freelance editor… you get the idea.)
  3. The length of your book (yes, this affects the overall production cost, especially when it comes to editing.)
  4. The quality you’re aiming for.
  5. Whether or not you’re planning on having both an e-book version and a print version of your book.

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Posted July 19, 2012 by LediaR in Uncategorized

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Write Away

For the past couple of months I have been trying to earn some extra money through my writing. Whilst I would love this to be through my short stories, I am still not confident enough to send anything out to publishers.  In the meantime as I still need a few additional pennies to keep the bills at bay, I chose to pursue article writing.

Although I have a background in journalism, becoming an online copywriter was a little tricky. I didn’t know where to start. First I became an approved writer at Demand Studios but found that unless you have specialist knowledge then it will be hard to find assignments. For example if you want to write about buying curtains, you need to be a well established home and garden journalist to pick up the job.

Squidoo is using article writing to create ‘Lenses’ using a free platform. Here you…

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Posted July 19, 2012 by LediaR in Uncategorized

Writing Advice: the Good, the Bad and the Useful!   4 comments

Line art representation of a Quill

Line art representation of a Quill (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Writing exercise 3

Writing exercise 3 (Photo credit: aaipodpics)

One thing I hate to see is bad advice given. One particular bit of “bad advice” I keep reading about is, “If you want to become a better writer, all you need to do is write, write, write. The more you write, the better writer you will become.” That is like telling someone who wants to become a carpenter, “All you need to do is grab a hammer and some nails and build, build, build. Then after, hmm let’s say a really long time, maybe you will create something worth sitting on, living in, or whatever.”

I have better advice. “Learn HOW to write first!

  • Take CLASSES on writing
  • READ books on writing and successful authors in the genre(s) that interest you
  •  AND THEN write, write, write, after you have learned how to first

Next on the list is to join a CRITIQUE GROUP, that is if you are REALLY interested in becoming a writer that others want to read!

Ken Robinson says, “…schools kill creativity…”   3 comments

Sir Ken Robinson makes an entertaining and profoundly moving case for creating an education system that nurtures (rather than undermines) creativity.

Why you should listen to him:

Why don’t we get the best out of people? Sir Ken Robinson argues that it’s because we’ve been educated to become good workers, rather than creative thinkers. Students with restless minds and bodies — far from being cultivated for their energy and curiosity — are ignored or even stigmatized, with terrible consequences. “We are educating people out of their creativity,” Robinson says. It’s a message with deep resonance. Robinson’s TEDTalk has been distributed widely around the Web since its release in June 2006. The most popular words framing blog posts on his talk? “Everyone should watch this.”

A visionary cultural leader, Sir Ken led the British government‘s 1998 advisory committee on creative and cultural education, a massive inquiry into the significance of creativity in the educational system and the economy, and was knighted in 2003 for his achievements. His latest book, The Element: How Finding Your Passion Changes Everything, a deep look at human creativity and education, was published in January 2009.

“Ken’s vision and expertise is sought by public and commercial organizations throughout the world.”

BBC Radio 4

Cover of "The Element: How Finding Your P...

Cover via Amazon

Amy Tan on Creativity   Leave a comment

Amy Tan, author

Amy Tan, author (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Novelist Amy Tan digs deep into the creative process, looking for hints of how hers evolved.

 

Why you should listen to her:

Born in the US to immigrant parents from China, Amy Tan rejected her mother’s expectations that she become a doctor and concert pianist. She chose to write fiction instead. Her much-loved, best-selling novels have been translated into 35 languages. She’s writing a new novel and creating the libretto for The Bonesetter’s Daughter, which will have its world premiere in September 2008 with the San Francisco Opera.

Tan was the creative consultant for Sagwa, the Emmy-nominated PBS series for children, and she has appeared as herself on The Simpsons. She’s the lead rhythm dominatrix, backup singer and second tambourine with the Rock Bottom Remainders, a literary garage band that has raised more than a million dollars for literacy programs.

“[She] has a wonderful eye for what is telling, a fine ear for dialogue, a deep empathy for her subject matter and a guilelessly straightforward way of writing.”

Orville Schell, New York Times

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Ruth Ann Nordin is a successful self-published author. I have followed her advice for a year or so now and find that her writing tips are always right on target!

Self-Published Authors Helping Other Authors

It seems to me that there’s so much focus on things that truly do not matter to writing a book.  Authors squabble over passive vs. active voice, whether it’s okay to use adverbs or not, how often you can write a certain word in a scene, etc.  In my opinion, all those little details aren’t that important.  Passive voice is okay.  Adverbs are okay.  If you want to repeat the word “walk” in a scene, that’s okay, too.  The point is not whether you use these techniques or not.  It’s HOW you use them.

The bottom line with any book is the story.  Was it a story that compelled the reader to keep turning the page?  Was it a story that made the reader lose sleep because he/she had to keep reading?

You want to know who cares about these things?  Writers (aspiring or otherwise), editors, and others in the…

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Posted July 1, 2012 by LediaR in Uncategorized

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