Archive for the ‘Inspiration’ Category

J. K. Rowling – A Year In The Life (TV, 2007)   3 comments

Author J.K. Rowling reads from Harry Potter an...

Author J.K. Rowling reads from Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone at the Easter Egg Roll at White House. Screenshot taken from official White House video. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Joanne “Jo” Rowling  was born 31 July 1965), pen name J. K. Rowling, is a British novelist, best known as the author of the Harry Potter fantasy series.

Harry Potter is a series of seven fantasy novels written by the British author J. K. Rowling. The books chronicle the adventures of a wizard,Harry Potter, and his friends Ronald Weasley and Hermione Granger, all of whom are students at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. The main story arc concerns Harry’s quest to overcome the Dark wizard Lord Voldemort, whose aims are to become immortal, conquer thewizarding world, subjugate non-magical people, and destroy all those who stand in his way, especially Harry Potter.

Geoffrey Zimmerman: Advice to Aspiring Writers   Leave a comment

Geoffrey Zimmerman is an American author and screenwriter currently living in RichmondVirginia.

He is a prolific writer who has recently published the romantic adventure novel Love Never Dies Book 1: The Parting set in soviet ruledPoland

Conversation: Philip Roth   1 comment

English: 1st edition cover

English: 1st edition cover (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Goodbye, Columbus

Goodbye, Columbus (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

He first gained attention with the 1959 novella Goodbye, Columbus, an irreverent and humorous portrait of American-Jewish life for which he received the U.S. National Book Award for Fiction. In 1969 his profile rose significantly after the publication of the (then) controversial Portnoy’s Complaint, the humorous and sexually explicit psychoanalytical monologue of “a lust-ridden, mother-addicted young Jewish bachelor”, filled with “intimate, shameful detail, and coarse, abusive language”.

Ken Robinson says, “…schools kill creativity…”   3 comments

Sir Ken Robinson makes an entertaining and profoundly moving case for creating an education system that nurtures (rather than undermines) creativity.

Why you should listen to him:

Why don’t we get the best out of people? Sir Ken Robinson argues that it’s because we’ve been educated to become good workers, rather than creative thinkers. Students with restless minds and bodies — far from being cultivated for their energy and curiosity — are ignored or even stigmatized, with terrible consequences. “We are educating people out of their creativity,” Robinson says. It’s a message with deep resonance. Robinson’s TEDTalk has been distributed widely around the Web since its release in June 2006. The most popular words framing blog posts on his talk? “Everyone should watch this.”

A visionary cultural leader, Sir Ken led the British government‘s 1998 advisory committee on creative and cultural education, a massive inquiry into the significance of creativity in the educational system and the economy, and was knighted in 2003 for his achievements. His latest book, The Element: How Finding Your Passion Changes Everything, a deep look at human creativity and education, was published in January 2009.

“Ken’s vision and expertise is sought by public and commercial organizations throughout the world.”

BBC Radio 4

Cover of "The Element: How Finding Your P...

Cover via Amazon

Amy Tan on Creativity   Leave a comment

Amy Tan, author

Amy Tan, author (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Novelist Amy Tan digs deep into the creative process, looking for hints of how hers evolved.

 

Why you should listen to her:

Born in the US to immigrant parents from China, Amy Tan rejected her mother’s expectations that she become a doctor and concert pianist. She chose to write fiction instead. Her much-loved, best-selling novels have been translated into 35 languages. She’s writing a new novel and creating the libretto for The Bonesetter’s Daughter, which will have its world premiere in September 2008 with the San Francisco Opera.

Tan was the creative consultant for Sagwa, the Emmy-nominated PBS series for children, and she has appeared as herself on The Simpsons. She’s the lead rhythm dominatrix, backup singer and second tambourine with the Rock Bottom Remainders, a literary garage band that has raised more than a million dollars for literacy programs.

“[She] has a wonderful eye for what is telling, a fine ear for dialogue, a deep empathy for her subject matter and a guilelessly straightforward way of writing.”

Orville Schell, New York Times

Sarah Kay: If I Should Have a Daughter   Leave a comment

Spoken word poet Sarah Kay tells the story of her metamorphosis and gives two breathtaking performances of “B” and “Hiroshima.”

Elif Shafak: The politics of fiction   2 comments

Elif Shafak builds on the simple idea that listening to stories will not only widen our imaginations, but also help us overcome identity politics.

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