Archive for the ‘TEDTalks’ Category

Ken Robinson says, “…schools kill creativity…”   3 comments

Sir Ken Robinson makes an entertaining and profoundly moving case for creating an education system that nurtures (rather than undermines) creativity.

Why you should listen to him:

Why don’t we get the best out of people? Sir Ken Robinson argues that it’s because we’ve been educated to become good workers, rather than creative thinkers. Students with restless minds and bodies — far from being cultivated for their energy and curiosity — are ignored or even stigmatized, with terrible consequences. “We are educating people out of their creativity,” Robinson says. It’s a message with deep resonance. Robinson’s TEDTalk has been distributed widely around the Web since its release in June 2006. The most popular words framing blog posts on his talk? “Everyone should watch this.”

A visionary cultural leader, Sir Ken led the British government‘s 1998 advisory committee on creative and cultural education, a massive inquiry into the significance of creativity in the educational system and the economy, and was knighted in 2003 for his achievements. His latest book, The Element: How Finding Your Passion Changes Everything, a deep look at human creativity and education, was published in January 2009.

“Ken’s vision and expertise is sought by public and commercial organizations throughout the world.”

BBC Radio 4

Cover of "The Element: How Finding Your P...

Cover via Amazon

Amy Tan on Creativity   Leave a comment

Amy Tan, author

Amy Tan, author (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Novelist Amy Tan digs deep into the creative process, looking for hints of how hers evolved.

 

Why you should listen to her:

Born in the US to immigrant parents from China, Amy Tan rejected her mother’s expectations that she become a doctor and concert pianist. She chose to write fiction instead. Her much-loved, best-selling novels have been translated into 35 languages. She’s writing a new novel and creating the libretto for The Bonesetter’s Daughter, which will have its world premiere in September 2008 with the San Francisco Opera.

Tan was the creative consultant for Sagwa, the Emmy-nominated PBS series for children, and she has appeared as herself on The Simpsons. She’s the lead rhythm dominatrix, backup singer and second tambourine with the Rock Bottom Remainders, a literary garage band that has raised more than a million dollars for literacy programs.

“[She] has a wonderful eye for what is telling, a fine ear for dialogue, a deep empathy for her subject matter and a guilelessly straightforward way of writing.”

Orville Schell, New York Times

Sarah Kay: If I Should Have a Daughter   Leave a comment

Spoken word poet Sarah Kay tells the story of her metamorphosis and gives two breathtaking performances of “B” and “Hiroshima.”

Elif Shafak: The politics of fiction   2 comments

Elif Shafak builds on the simple idea that listening to stories will not only widen our imaginations, but also help us overcome identity politics.

Chimamanda Adichie: The Danger of a Single Story   Leave a comment

Chimamanda Adichie tells how she found her authentic cultural voice and warns that if we hear only a single story we risk a critical misunderstanding.

Elizabeth Gilbert on nurturing creativity   6 comments

Elizabeth Gilbert muses on the impossible things we expect from artists and geniuses — and shares the radical idea that, instead of the rare person “being” a genius, all of us “have” a genius. It’s a funny, personal and surprisingly moving talk.

Why you should listen to her:

Elizabeth Gilbert faced down a ­premidlife crisis by doing what we all secretly dream of – running off for a year. Her travels through Italy, India and Indonesia resulted in the megabestselling and deeply beloved memoir Eat, Pray, Love, about her process of finding herself by leaving home.

She’s a longtime magazine writer – covering music and politics for Spin andGQ – as well as a novelist and short-story writer. Her books include the story collection Pilgrims, the novel Stern Men (about lobster fishermen in Maine) and a biography of the woodsman Eustace Conway, called The Last American Man. Her work has been the basis for one movie so far (Coyote Ugly, based on her own memoir, in this magazine article, of working at the famously raunchy bar), and now it looks as if Eat, Pray, Love is on the same track, with the part of Gilbert reportedly to be played by Julia Roberts. Not bad for a year off.

Gilbert also owns and runs the import shop Two Buttons in Frenchtown, New Jersey.

“Gilbert is irreverent, hilarious, zestful, courageous, intelligent, and in masterful command of her sparkling prose.”

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