Archive for the ‘Arts’ Tag

STEPHEN KING on Writing, Scary Stories, and More   4 comments

Stephen Edwin King (born September 21, 1947) is an American author of contemporary horror, suspense, science fiction and fantasy. His books have sold more than 350 million copies[9] and have been adapted into a number of feature films, television movies and comic books. King has published 50 novels, including seven under the pen-name of Richard Bachman, and five non-fiction books. He has written nearly two hundred short stories, most of which have been collected in nine collections of short fiction. Many of his stories are set in his home state ofMaine.

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Patrick Rothfuss Talks with Peter Orullian   Leave a comment

The Kingkiller Chronicle

The Kingkiller Chronicle (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Patrick James Rothfuss (born June 6, 1973) is an American fantasy writer and college lecturer. He is the author of the projected three-volume series The Kingkiller Chronicle.

Terry Brooks Talks with Peter Orullian Parts 1-3   1 comment

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Terry Brooks is one of my favorite authors. I have not only read most of his books, he has also been a tremendous inspiration to me as a fantasy adventure writer. I also had the honor of meeting the author and his sweet wife at the Maui Writer’s Conference in 1997.

Terence Dean “Terry” Brooks (born January 8, 1944) is an American writer of fantasy fiction. He writes mainly epic fantasy, and has also written two movie novelizations. He has written 23 New York Times bestsellers during his writing career, and has over 21 million copies of his books in print. He is one of the biggest-selling living fantasy writers.

How to Write a Novel (Free Download)   Leave a comment

Expert Tips on How to Write a Novel (The Perfect Chapter One)

Whether you’re a first time novelist needing help writing a novel or a published author looking for a few solid tips for writing a novel that will elevate your prose, we are here to help. That’s why we pulled together these eight amazing tips that you need to consider when you start writing a novel.

Many guides to writing a novel will offer the advice, Start your story with action, but what does that really mean? Is it true? It’s more important to focus on other key elements, especially concrete advice, like the ones provided here in 8 Ways to Write the Perfect Chapter One. Plus, the tips ring true no matter what kind of novel you are writing.

Whether you’re looking to learn how to write a horror novel, how to write a crime novel or how to write a best selling fantasy novel, you’re really just looking to learn how to write a successful novel—and this free download will start you off on the right foot.

How to Write a Novel: The Perfect Chapter One(Taken from Writer’s Digest website http://www.writersdigest.com/how-to-write-a-novel?et_mid=602397&rid=234554334)

If you’re already in the process of outlining a novel, take a minute to stop and make sure doing everything you need to be doing in your Chapter One, like introducing your main character the right way and enticing the audience with a mini-plot (both are covered in the giveaway). Download this collection of tips to get started writing good novels today!

  1. Resist terror. Writing a first chapter is just as scary as it is exciting. You hear things like “one wrong move will kill your chances with an agent or editor.” Getting over that fear is a key step into moving your story forward and this section provides ways to do just that.
  2. Decide on tense and point of view. Once upon a time, writers used to pick one point of view and a tense and roll with it. But many modern writers, including John Grisham, have broken the mold and found ways to skillfully drive their narrative by mixing points of view and even tenses. Chapter One is when this decision needs to be made for your novel. The tips on how to write the opening of a novel in this download will guide you to choosing what’s best for your story.
  3. Choose a natural starting point. When writing fiction, your possibilities on how to open the first page of your book seem limitless—and they are. With so many options, making the decision on when and where to open your story can be stressful, though. Let us help take some of the stress out of it by sharing these best practices on how to find the perfect place to start your novel. If fact, trying these methods may leave you with additional scenes that aren’t right for the beginning, but are exactly what you need later in your story.
  4. Present a strong character right away. When writing your first novel, you need to avoid certain pitfalls that are common for first-time novelists. A key indication to agents that this is your first book is if you try to lure the reader in by holding back the main character. This is a mistake. You need to establish your main character early so readers have a chance to connect with him or her. Get the questions that you need to be asking (and answering) yourself about your main character to make sure you don’t hide too much and leave your readers unconnected.

Twelve Months of Writing Workshops   1 comment

Starting in January 2013, I will offer creative writing workshops one Saturday a month. The elements of fiction are the main topics.

My new website: http://lediar.wix.com/ledia-runnels includes all workshops, time and place as well as novels under Vrint Publishing available on Amazon.com and Kindle. If you live in or near Spring, Texas, or plan to visit, come join the fun and learn at the same time.

The first Workshop is:

“In The Beginning: myths, legends, fables, folklore and fairy tales

 Learn creative writing using the structure of ancient storytelling.

I look forward to seeing you there.

Manic Mode! “Self-Publishing in Free Fall” Part Two   2 comments

My journey as a writer began when my two younger sisters and I would would lie awake in our bunk beds. While they listened, I made up stories resembling fairy tales to tell them. Later, in high school, I wrote free verse poetry, inspired by pop/rock songs such as Neal Diamond’s “Sweet Caroline” and “Make it With You” by David Gates of the pop-rock bandBread. The stories and poetry I created took little more than imagination and heart to construct. Which is important, but…

A secret that I share when asked about my personal journey as a writer is that from elementary to high schoolgrammar was not an easy subject for me. I struggled constantly with simple things such as sentence structure and proper spelling. To this day, commas still drive me crazy. So, before venturing into the terrifying, wonderful world of self-publishing, I had first to learn the “rules” of writing, whether nonfiction or fiction was the desired outcome. To create compelling fiction, I would need a strong understanding of story structure, character, plot, scene, action, and dialogue.

There are scores of books on writing technique lining the shelves of my bookcase. At one time, I had so many that I loaded up the beginner books and gave them away to the local library and my weekly writers’ group. Over the years, I have taken correspondence writing course, attended writer‘s conferences, as well as taking literature and writing courses in college. I still study and listen to authors that I admire teach me the tricks of the trade. All the while, I continue to write and hone my skills. I know if I want to sell my writing, I must first become a skilled writer.

Determination and the willingness to make my dreams come true have proved powerful tools for me. That coupled with hours upon hours of writing and rewriting to get the desired results. To remind myself of what it takes to write well, I think about how to create a beautiful, livable house. Only a skilled architecture will do to draw up the plans. After that, I would trust only experienced carpenters, plumbers, electricians, and other craftsmen to build it. It is the same when it comes to creating sellable writing.

 Continued…

Writing Prompts: Day Two   5 comments

Second writing prompt.

“Parts of Yourself as Different Characters”, pick two contrasting parts of yourself and create two different characters to represent each side and then place those two characters in a particular setting and let them talk.”  Dr. Greg Oaks

Have fun and share your results with us if you choice to do so.

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